History

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HIST 020 - American Civilization to 1877

This course is designed to introduce students to the main events and themes of American history before 1877. This course is not intended to simply acquaint the student with facts, but to teach them how to analyze those facts so that they can understand why historical events in America unfolded as they did. A larger goal of the course is to teach them how to think "historically" and to perceive the relevance of the past to the present.

HIST 021 - American Civilization since 1877

This course is designed as the second half of a two-term survey of American history, covering the period from 1877 to the present. In terms of historical knowledge, History 021 seeks to introduce students to salient events, developments, and themes of American history since 1877.

HIST 120 - Europe Since 1848

History is a continuum encompassing science, political theory, humanities, the arts, and everything else that mankind may pursue. European affairs before and since 1848 all had an effect on what went on in the future.

HIST 144 - The World at War 1939-1945

This course offers a wide-ranging description and analysis of the Second World War, combining military history with political, social and cultural approaches. One major goal is to describe how large-scale war serves as a revolutionary social and cultural force in its own right, massively accelerating social change.

HIST 447 - Recent American History

This course examines major issues and developments in American society from the end of Reconstruction to the present. Among the topics to be covered are: the rise of the Cold War and its effects on American society; America’s evolving place in world affairs; mass consumerism and popular culture; the unfolding of modern liberalism and conservatism; the civil rights and women’s movements; the Vietnam War (and the war over the war back home); the welfare state and deregulation; deindustrialization and globalization; shifting currents of immigration; and, the new realities of the post-Cold War, post-9/11 world.

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